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, connecticut, followed by the loss of our wonderful colleague, senator daniel inouye. so i will leave this extraordinary institution and experience with a heavy heart for those who have been lost just in the last few days. i do want to thank you for asking me to represent them in washington. i want to thank the many people who have served on my staff for almost 20 years. i have to say i am touched that both senses, on both sides of this room are filled with my staff members who have been so hard-working, so loyal, and have produced so much in 20 years for our state and nation. and i think them. i do want to thank my colleagues and all the people who work here. senators, but also those who work behind the scenes to make our lives as good as they can be with the hard hours that we all have. those who keep our buildings safe and clean, the work in the library, the shops, the cafeterias, and to guide tens of thousands of tourists through our nation's beautiful capital each year. i want to thank my husband, ray, and her two children, bailey in houston, they are 11 now, and so many of my co
, westport, connecticut. my favorite senator. [laughter] >> that's why i called on him. >> pretty good. >> i think that a couple lessons have been learned over the last ten years and maybe in the last five years and not the least of which is elections don't mean democracy. and i think i wonder if there are people in this world who just don't want democracy, and is that necessarily a bad thing in particular parts of the world? and how do we, in the u.s., respond to that if that, if what i posture is possible? >> well, it's great to see you, ken, thanks. so generally speaking, i would say from what i've observed people do want democracy. they may settle in with dictatorship for a while, but ultimately there's a natural human yearning for freedom. and opportunity. economic opportunity. i went in with john mccain to egypt and tunisia within a month after the arab spring uprisings, i was really quite fascinated to talk to the people who led both of those revolutions. and one point that struck me was that they were motivated as much by a feeling of economic outrage as they were by their desire for
's estates in the pond in wealthy areas in connecticut. it stuck with me and studied court records, i found another name for her and tracked her down and made the call. we have a lot of conversations since then. >> host: you write in your book, quoting vino mahmoud. he had never had many black friends. i saw that switch happen most markedly during the period that i was very close to him. he was the most deliberate person i ever met in terms of constructing his own identity and his achievements, really an achievement of identity in the modern world. first the shift from not international to american and not white, but black. >> host: >> guest: beenu mahmood was one of a group of pakistani france he had in new york. they shared with him sort of an international perspective which he lived in indonesia and his brother was there, he was searching for himself and comfortable with these guys. when he got in new york, they move their, he was the various to guy -- very astute guy. obama moved to new york to find his blackness but it didn't happen. president obama when i interviewed him in the oval o
had griswold versus connecticut, so that married couples could not be denied the right to buy birth control. 1956, chief justice warren volution eyes criminal procedure and perhaps more importantly, changing television dramas forever. [laughter] 1967, perhaps the best named case in supreme court history. what was the case? state could no longer bear him racial intermarriage. think about that in 1967. there are people in this room who were alive in 1967. [laughter] it was still illegal in a lot of states and when barack obama's parents got married in kenya, i'm sorry, i mean in -- [laughter] >> at such a cheap joke and i apologize. but everybody knows mitt romney is having a rough time as a presidential candidate but a sentence that i have not heard uttered anywhere is the only donald trump had been the nominee. because he built this idea that barack obama was built in kenya other than the united states. but that campaign did not take off exactly. mitt romney is there for better or worse. when barack obama's parents got married in 1960, and it wasn't kenya, i'm sorry, it was in hawai
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